Introducing Kurt Huggins and Zelda Devon

Introducing Kurt Huggins and Zelda Devon

By DCE Editorial Monday, April 12th, 2010
THE UNWRITTEN #12 is one off with amazing artwork by two newcomers Kurt Huggins and Zelda Devon. I asked them a few questions about working on THE UNWRITTEN, so read along and check out their art, then pick up a copy on Wednesday! PM:Tell me a bit about yourselves. You're both recent grads? Where'd you go to school? What projects were you working on prior to taking issue #12 of THE UNWRITTEN on? K&Z: About a decade ago we went to school somewhere hot and swampy, more an extended social engagement than an education. After a one year hangover, we sobered up by enrolling in a place called Portfolio Center. A design gulag, it made us professional in just two years. With newly minted portfolios we moved to NY and for three years toiled as designers, it had it's fun times but ended up being a job instead of a passion. In our spare time, we returned to drawing. Our fledgling efforts were posted online, and were greeted by a trickle of commissoned work. It was enough validation that we dived into illustration full time. That was about 2 and a half years ago. Now we're flooded with deadlines. We just wrapped up a 26 page comic for Tor.com, called King of an Endless Sky. Our third story for them. PM:Do you read comics? K&Z: Yes. Our numerous shelves creak like a hundred year-old galleon from the weight of comics. pg01 PM:Tell me about about your process. How do you work together? Is this water color? K&Z: We work together via an ancient alchemical process we discovered in the lining of an aged trunk bejewelled with locks and mysteries. The process involves equal parts compassion, frustration, communication, faith, ego and love. The color work is done much the same way. PM:There are some Winnie The Pooh, Beatrix Potter, Alice in Wonderland references in the text of this issue, what were some of your artistic inspirations? K&Z: We definitely drew inspiration from most of those sources. Some other favorites include Cornwell, Lyendecker, Bilibin and Fechin, as well as an amazing woodblock artist by the name of Yoshida Hiroshi. If I gave you the full list you might run out of internet. pg02 PM:What were your first thoughts when you were approached by DC COMICS to work on THE UNWRITTEN? K&Z: When asked to work on the unwritten, we had two simultaneous thoughts; "Oh, absolutely we'll do it" and "How are we possibly going to get this done?" There was a lot of other client work we were juggling. However with a generous lead time along with Peter Gross's incredible breakdowns to cheat from, the impossible proved to be a 22 page comic. PM:What's it like to work on your first published comic book? K&Z: It's thrilling. I don't think we could've imagined a better first issue to be a part of. Mike and Peter have crafted an amazing narrative overall, but this particular story is a treat made just for us. It's wonderfully dark and hilarious. Mr. Bun is such a bastard. A bastard, however, that you can sympathize with. How would you not go insane trapped in a world like that? pg03